Tag Archives: church

St Mary’s Church, Stotfold

Summary = A major renovation to where large areas of external stonework had failed at St Mary's Church Stotfold.

Value = approximately £160,000

Location = Stotfold, Bedfordshire

Architect =Barker Associates

Challenge = This failure was mainly due to the fact that it was constructed using ‘Clunch’ stone which in its day was sourced locally, but being a very soft and pervious stone has not stood the tests of time.

Solution = The replacement stone was produced by our sister company Collins & Curtis Masonry. Clipsham Stone was used in place of Clunch for an all weathering stone which will stand up the elements better overtime.

All other stonework to ornate tracery sections to windows and door surrounds was replaced with Chicksgrove as good quality Clunch is now becoming difficult to source.

The results to the church has been a fantastic success and we have since secured additional works internally which start in January 2018.

 

Westminster Abbey

Under the instruction from Ptolemy Dean Architects Ltd (Westminster Abbeys Surveyor of the fabric) Bakers are currently carrying out roof works to the medieval South Triforium and the Great Cloister within Westminster Abbey.

The roof works will be completed in time for the opening of a new museum and gallery, located in the Abbey's medieval Triforium, next year. After being hidden from public over 700 years, the Triforium will become “The Queen's Diamond Jubilee Galleries”.

70ft above the Abbey floor, the new gallery will provide visitors with magnificent views down over the Abbey buildings and the Palace of Westminster. Roof works carried out by Bakers involve stripping the existing roof, recasting original lead and re-leading part of the South Triforium and part of the Main Cloister.

A full overhaul of the rainwater goods is also being carried out, with a combination of new and refurbished lead downpipes, hoppers and chutes being fitted. A new hopper, corbel stone and 22 metre downpipe has been introduced, formed to mirror the Christopher Wren era hoppers that are already in use.

Bakers are increasing the gradient of the Triforium roof by increasing the fall of the lead bays (compliant with lead sheet association guidelines). Other structural repairs include reinforcing 300-year-old oak primary rafters using a flitch plate repair and other associated structural repairs to the oak roof.

Other works include careful rehoming of monuments and statues from other parts of the Abbey onto the Triforium floor.

With the improvements to the rainwater goods, Bakers will undertake the renewal of the below ground drainage within the Great Cloister, which will also include the exciting addition of a fountain to be positioned in the centre of the Cloister, formed on York Stone paving with a lead cistern fountain. These works will continue into Spring 2018.

Jim Vincent, Clerk of the Works at Westminster Abbey said:

Bakers of Danbury have successfully managed access issues and restrictions whilst carrying out the works at the Abbey. The main access route into site is through the Great Cloister, which is a busy area of the Abbey accessible to the public from 9.30am every day.

We have found Bakers of Danbury to be considerate of the public and employees of the Abbey and have undertaken the works to the Abbey with the utmost care and attention at all times and look forward to continuing our working relationship with them in the future. The high standard of work is commensurate with the status of the building and is what is expected of contractors working at Westminster Abbey."

Highly Commended – National RICS Awards 2017

After winning the RICS (Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors) East of England Awards 2017, Building Conservation Category earlier this year, our project was entered into the National RICS Awards Grand Final.

We are pleased to announce that our project achieved “Highly Commended” within the Building Conservation category of the National RICS Awards, which took place earlier this month. The Regional and National RICS awards were for the specialist restoration and new contemporary design extension and mezzanine floor to Quay Place, Ipswich (formerly St Mary-at-the-Quay). To find out more about the project Click here .

RICS described Quay Place as:

An exemplar conservation project, combining traditional approaches with cutting-edge innovation. The CCT have a proven track record of exemplary conservation and imaginative re-use of Churches that have fallen out of use.

St Mary at the Quay posed significant structural questions that had to be overcome in order to provide the building with a sustainable future.

An impressive structural engineering solution was enacted to remove hugely unsightly and rudimentary previous stabilisation works and which was cleverly integrated to provide the structure for additional office space.

Conservation repairs have been neatly undertaken and a new extension almost seamlessly added in matching materials. The new use provides a haven of calm within this busy area and it is felt this project will act as a catalyst for the completion of the areas redevelopment.

 

BAKERS SAY FAREWELL

Bakers have reluctantly said farewell to one of its long standing members of the team. Peter Delderfield, who joined Bakers 26 years ago, worked for us as a very skilled Stone Mason and Site Foreman, experience which is hard to come by nowadays.

Peter will be sorely missed, both by his colleagues and clients. He has been a credit to Bakers due to his enthusiasm, hard work and dedication.

I’m sure all who know or have worked with Peter Delderfield over the past 26 years, will join me in wishing him a wonderful retirement.

Thank you for all of your hard work over the years and congratulations Peter, we’ll miss you!!

 

King Harold Memorial

Over 50 years have passed since Bakers of Danbury were originally instructed to install a memorial stone for King Harold within the grounds of Waltham Abbey church. Fast forward to 2017 and Bakers of Danbury have returned to restore the stone memorial.

The monument was originally installed in the churchyard in 1964, overseen by Mr David Wood who later became Managing Director of Bakers of Danbury. Bakers of Danbury have returned over 50 years later to restore the memorial. This time, works were over seen by David Wood’s son, Antony Wood who having followed in his father’s footsteps, is now a Director of Bakers of Danbury.

The simple granite memorial consists of a small plaque of smooth granite inlaid, with the inscription “Harold, King of England-obit 1066”. In addition to restoring the original memorial, Bakers of Danbury also donated and installed a new inscribed plaque.

The existing tablet in front of the memorial stone, (with the inscription “This stone marks the position of the high altar behind which King Harold is said to be buried 1066”) was also cleaned and restored.

This is all part of the 950th anniversary events commemorating the death of King Harold at the Battle of Hastings. These events have been made possible by a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund to a partnership led by Epping Forest District Museum. The monument is the focus for the annual memorial event commemorating the death of Harold on 14 October, organised by the King Harold Day Society.

Brentwood Cathedral

Location = Brentwood Cathedral

Client = Diocese of Brentwood

Summary = Internal decoration and cleaning of the high level gilding, stone columns and floors.

Challenge = High level internal access and protection of the organ whilst works carried out overhead.

Solution = Full bird cage scaffold erected to use when cleaning gilding and when decorating of the ceiling upper walls. External access provision for glazing contractor to replace the existing leaking lead lights in the cupola.

Fr Martin Boland, Dean of the Cathedral said:

"I would like to thank you again for the professionalism of Bakers of Danbury, for your personal advice and for all those who worked so hard, efficiently and to the highest standard."

Bakers win RICS award

We are pleased to announce that we are Winners of the RICS (Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors) East of England Awards 2017, Building Conservation Category.

The award was for the specialist restoration and new contemporary design extension and mezzanine floor to Quay Place, Ipswich (formerly St Mary-at-the-Quay).

We have also been entered into the National RICS Awards Grand Final taking place later this year.

Click here for more information.

The Charterhouse, London

Value = £2,100,000

Location = London, EC1M 6AN

Architect = Eric Parry Architects

Conservation Architect = Richard Griffiths Architects

Landscape Architect = Todd Longstaffe-Gowan

Project management = Jackson Coles

Summary = Having been hidden from view and closed to public for over 650 years - the Charterhouse, a historic London landmark recently underwent extensive remodelling and conservation before being formerly opened to public by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh on 28th February 2017.

Challenge = The large conservation, restoration and alteration project “Revealing the Charterhouse” included remodelling of the Grade I listed building to house a new museum, learning centre, cafe, reception area and public toilets, as well as conservation and restoration works to the external fabric of Charterhouse Chapel and the re-design of Charterhouse Square.

Works took place whilst paying careful consideration to the Brothers who reside at the Charterhouse.

Solution = The recently completed £4 million project, “Revealing the Charterhouse” was funded through the Heritage Lottery Fund and other generous supporters. To ensure that the project was carried out to the highest standard, Bakers of Danbury were appointed Principal Contractors.

Ann Kenrick OBE, Master, the Charterhouse said:

“We are hugely grateful for the works carried out by Bakers of Danbury and for their unwavering dedication to the Revealing the Charterhouse project. The skilled craftsmen from Bakers work to an extremely high standard producing a finish which has exceeded all of our expectations. They were a pleasure to work with, always keeping to their word, and we couldn’t be happier with their overall approach and diligence.

I would recommend Bakers of Danbury to anyone."

REVEALING THE CHARTERHOUSE

The project “Revealing the Charterhouse” not only opens the Charterhouse to the general public, but as depicted by its name, has made the historic gem visible to passers-by, who otherwise may not have noticed the beautiful medieval buildings partially hiding behind a hedgerow. Bakers of Danbury replaced the hedges with new landscaping including entrance gates with the motto in old French “virtue is the only nobility”.

As a result of the new landscaping, as you approach Chapel Court (the entrance to Charterhouse) a beautiful path constructed of Scoutmoor Yorkstone will lead you through the entrance gates to the museum entrance - but before you proceed through the gates, at your feet you will find a feature stone with a brass inlay outlining the original footprint of the monastery.

Chosen for its durability; the slabs of the Scoutmoor Yorkstone pathway measure as large as 1500mm x 1500mm. Before the 63mm thick Yorkstone path could be laid, trial holes were made to Chapel Court and inspected by the Museum of London Archaeology team. To keep excavation to a minimum, the path was laid on a raised reinforced concrete base.

As you enter Chapel Court through the entrance gates, you will find a cast bronze model of the existing Charterhouse buildings. After the model was cast, it was sent away for patination – a decorative technique in which chemical solutions are applied to react with the surface, to provide a thin layer of coloured corrosion which gives an antique appearance.

The new landscaping to Chapel Court depicts the footprint of the original Chapel walls which was built in 1349 for the victims of the Black Death. It also gives pride of place to the new memorial of Sir Walter Manny – the monastery’s principle founder. The memorial marks the final resting place of Sir Walter Manny and is constructed of a beautiful Travertine tombstone, with base, plinth and eased arrises also of Travertine stone. On it is carved Sir Walter Manny, Died 1372.

CHARTERHOUSE CHAPEL

As part of the project, Bakers of Danbury carried out conservation and restoration works to the external fabric of the Chapel visible from Chapel Court. The extensive fabric repairs include stone cleaning and lime mortar repointing to the whole chapel and tower, as well as the traditional method of shelter coating to help preserve the softer friable stone. Where necessary Kentish Ragstone and Elm Park Bath stone supplied by Bakers of Danbury’s sister company Collins and Curtis Masonry sympathetically replaced stone which was beyond repair.

THE MUSEUM AND LEARNING CENTRE

The new reception area and learning centre are of a contemporary design with European Oak panelling and a painted plaster finish. A breathable silicate paint was used on existing solid walls, to prevent any moisture in the walls from causing ‘blistering’ and ‘bubbling’ of the paint.

As you enter the new reception area you will notice the impressive coffered ceiling, with indirect lighting within octagon recesses, which continues through the learning centre. The octagon coffered ceiling was designed to echo the octagon recess detail on the Chapel ceiling.

Bakers of Danbury carried out the base build for the new museum including climate control and secondary glazing. Bakers also relocated the sculpture representing Faith, Hope and Charity, to its new location looking over the museum.

CHARTERHOUSE SQUARE

As part of the project, Charterhouse Square was re-designed, inspired by its 18th century layout - this included the installation of gas lamps, a new pavilion, new benches and the refurbishment of the Grade II listed entrance gates and railings surrounding the square. The square has also been increased in size, by removing parking bays.

Quay Place, Ipswich, Suffolk

Value = £2,000,000

Location = Ipswich, Suffolk

Architect = Molyneux Kerr Architects

Summary = Regeneration of a Grade II Listed redundant medieval Church. New build extension and mezzanine floor of a contemporary design.

Challenge = The redundant church suffered from war damage, damp, a decayed roof and leaning walls.

Solution = Formerly the church of St Mary-at-the-Quay but now called Quay Place, was until its recent regeneration a redundant medieval Church.

The Grade II listed church which was believed to have been built around 1450 and 1550, is located next to Ipswich’s quayside. It suffered from war damage, damp, a decayed roof and leaning walls until the 17 month restoration programme gave Quay Place a new future as a centre for both heritage and well being activities, café and an event space alongside therapy provision.

The Churches Conservation Trust teamed up with the local charity Suffolk Mind, and together they secured Heritage Lottery Funds and European Regional Development Funds to cover the cost of the restoration. In April 2014 Bakers of Danbury started work on the project as Principal Contractor. The specialist restoration works include the structural stabilisation and incorporation of a large contemporary mezzanine floor for office space. A new contemporary design extension provides further offices and consulting rooms.

Bakers of Danbury's sister company Collins and Curtis Masonry supplied all new stone for the restoration and new build. Measurements were taken onsite to produce templates, which were then used to manufacture the replacement features to arches, jambs, tracery, cills and copings in their workshops. Traditional methods of masonry were used to manufacture the stone details.

The project was recently awarded a Civic Trust 2018 AABC Conservation award, RICS National 2017 (Highly Commended) and a RICS East of England 2017 award for Building Conservation. It also received a Highly Commended Award within the Ipswich Society Awards in 2016.

All images credited to Andy Marshall Architectural Photography

St Paul’s Cathedral, London

Value = £750,000

Location = London EC4

Architect = Caroe Architecture

Summary = Refurbishment to part of the Crypt

Challenge = Works took place whilst the Cathedral remained open to the general public.

Solution = In 2016 Bakers of Danbury returned to St Paul’s Cathedral, London - this time to refurbish part of the Crypt. Throughout the works, Bakers worked closely with the Cathedral works team to ensure works took place whilst the Cathedral remained open to the general public.

This interesting project involved very careful excavation of the Crypt floor and close working with the Cathedral Archaeologist, to ensure that any remains found were reburied.

The extensive refurbishment works included a new layout and refurbishment to the public washrooms, a total refurbishment of the Mezzanine floor, old clay pamment tiles laid from the Crypt to the public washrooms and comprehensive modern LED lighting installed to the Crypt and Mezzanine floor.