Category Archives: Listed Buildings

Listed House Renovation

Summary = A listed house renovation and remodeling

Bakers recently completed phase one of remodeling and refurbishment works to this early 16th century Grade II Listed house, whilst the family remained living in the property.

Works included internal remodeling, extensive new electrical and mechanical installation, joinery, ceiling and wall repairs, new cornices, decorating and some external works.

The ground floor was replaced with an insulated limecrete floor and finished with limestone flagstones. New timber paneling was fitted to some areas all fireplaces and surrounds were refurbished. Repointing was carried out to the inner fireplaces and a timber fireplaces with marble slips were installed to some fireplaces.

Most walls were replastered with haired lime and quirked beaded corners installed. Redecoration was carried out throughout the property.

All plumbing and heating system was installed with new period radiators throughout the property. Period sanitary ware was installed to three bathrooms. A completely new electrical system was installed.

Bakers’ in-house joinery workshop manufactured a number of bespoke fitted furnishings for the kitchen and some replica intenal doors to match the existing.

Externally, Kien render and paint (breathable mineral based render and paint) was applied and all timber box frame sash windows were refurbished.

Stone Replacement & Conservation

Summary = stone replacement and conservation work to a residential property, which included stone quoins, stone window jambs, stone window surrounds, stone windowsills and stone lintels

Challenge = Exposure to the weather had deteriorated some of the stonework. New replacement stone had to be sourced and cut to size to match the original pieces.

Solution = Located on the edge of Royston Heath, which is famous for the former horse racecourse, within the ancient town of Royston in East Hertfordshire; this traditionally built property was originally three separate cottages. An earlier sympathetic conversion to all three cottages has provided one beautiful, spacious residential property, which features flint cobbled external walls and stone quoins. Exposure to the weather had sadly deteriorated some of the stonework.

As Bakers of Danbury Ltd were carrying out repair and conservation work to the local church, St John the Baptist which had been devastated by a fire back in 2018, the owners of this property asked Bakers to carry out stone replacement and conservation work to their property. Bakers’ craftsmen measured the individual stones they had identified as being beyond repair and made templates for replacement stones to match the original. Bakers of Danbury’s sister company Collins and Curtis Masonry Ltd carefully selected Tottenhoe Clunch directly from the quarry to match the existing Clunch stonework to this property.

All stone quoins to the main gable end were replaced, together with complete window jambs, surrounds and lintels, cut and profiled by stone masons to match the existing. Yorkstone from “Edgehill” quarry was used to replace the windowsills.

The existing flint cobbles were carefully reinstated, where they had been disturbed, and repointed with an NHL 3.5 lime mortar mix with selected graded aggregate sands and fine flint chippings incorporated to match the existing mortar.

To hear more about similar projects about stone replacement and conservation visit our Latest News page or the Bakers of Danbury Facebook page.

Wall Repair and Strengthening

Summary = Wall repair and strengthening carried out at Holy Trinity Church in Halstead

Location = Halstead, Essex

Challenge = The challenge was digging the pockets in between the trees as the trees prevented the digger from being able to get to where it needed to excavate.

Solution = Bakers of Danbury carried out hand digging where the trees prevented access for the digger. Bakers also adjusted some of the placements to achieve equally spaced ties.

To repair and strengthen the wall Bakers of Danbury dug ten 1.2m3 pockets along the length, to the back of the 36m churchyard boundary wall. The pockets were poured with concrete which was cast around 1.6m long stainless steel rods. The rods had been inserted through the wall. On the wall face they were tied and bolted to steel pattress plates.

To provide additional reinforcement, two lengths of Helifix reinforcing ties, set in resin were inserted along the face of the wall, extending the whole 36m length.

Cllr Mick Radley, Mayor and Chairman of Halstead Town Council said;

“I’m really pleased that the council has taken action to conduct major repair work to the Holy Trinity Church boundary wall and to recognise the excellent work that has been done. The wall has been leaning for a number of years and the recent repair work has now strengthened the wall along its length to hold it in place.

This work was conducted as part of the Town Council’s obligations to maintain closed churchyards and was funded from financial reserves specifically allocated to the work. Design work was commissioned to The Morton Partnership and the repair work to Bakers of Danbury Heritage Ltd. I would like to thank all of those involved with the repair for the excellent work they have done and with minimum disruption to the community.”

To keep up to date on similar conservation projects carried out by Bakers of Danbury visit our Latest News page or the Bakers of Danbury Facebook page.

Church Fire Damage Repair

Summary = St John the Baptist Church in Royston was devastated by a fire. Bakers of Danbury have carried out phase one of works which included securing the structure and stripping the fire damaged materials which were beyond repair. Bakers are currently working on the second phase.

Location = Royston, Hertfordshire

Challenge = National lock down due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Solution = Bakers of Danbury were initially tasked with phase one of works which began May 2019 and involved six weeks stripping all fire damaged material and making the structure safe after it had suffered a devastating fire in the early hours of the 9th December 2018.

The fire which started in the tower devastated the tower and bell ringing chamber and caused significant damage to the medieval nave roof, in particular the west end of the roof. The church also suffered from subsequent water damage as a result of extinguishing the fire, which cause the floor to collapse.

After completing phase one of works, Bakers were awarded phase two of works which began at the fire damaged church in February 2020. Later the following month, due to the nature of the works and the confined working space, the project had to be put on hold during the national lock down due to the Covid-19 pandemic. In May the works resumed with the introduction of social distancing measures, sensible planning and safe working procedures which were implemented by Bakers' SHEQ Manager, Contract Manager and Site Manager for the project.

During phase two, a new tower roof with steel supporting girders was installed and covered in lead. New window reveals (in Clunch) were installed within the tower and repairs were made to the tower internal walls, particularly at the belfry level where it had been seriously damaged by the instense heat. Within the tower a quatrefoil window was replaced with one handcrafted by Bakers' sister company Collins and Curtis Masonry.

Lower down the tower, Bakers repaired the walls by stitching them with large pieces of Clunch. Re-pointing the stonework further restored and strengthened the tower. New copings in Barnack stone were installed to the tower parapet and new ashlar indents were also incorporated.

To the naive roof, which suffered significant damage, Bakers repaired the original inner wall plate and introduced a new outer wall plate to support the rafters. New rafters were installed where the fired had damaged the original ones beyond repair. Those original principal rafters which were salvaged have been repaired and supported by installing large stainless steel brackets (individual brackets weigh 175 kg each).

All timbers have been ice blasted to remove fire and smoke damage, taking particular attention to preserve historical graffiti which although had been damaged by the fire, was still legible. A new lead roof (code 7) will be installed and all rainwater goods will be replaced with cast aluminum.

Ice blast cleaning has been carried out in isolated areas of the church which suffered fire and smoke damage, for example around the windows and doors. Various cleaning trials have been carried out throughout the interior and exterior of the church. Phase 2 of works will be completed to deadline, January 2021. Bakers are working in close collaboration with the Project Quantity Surveyor to monitor overall contract values, variation costs and the final contract sum.

To keep up to date on similar conservation projects carried out by Bakers of Danbury visit our Latest News page or the Bakers of Danbury Facebook page.

Restoration of Oldest Church Remains

Summary = Restoration of apsidal remains, said to be the oldest church in Britain.

Location = Colchester, Essex

Challenge = The weather was causing erosion to the original core structure of the walls.

Solution = Restoration works have recently been carried out by Bakers of Danbury Ltd, to the remaining stonework belonging to what is said to be the oldest Christian Church in England.

The remains of the Church next to Colchester Police Station in Essex, are believed to date back to 320 A.D, toward the end of the Roman occupation in Britain. Originally excavated more than 40 years ago, the apsidal remains consist of septarian stone together with reclaimed roman tiles and pamments.

Commissioned by Colchester Borough Council and supported by Colchester Archaeological Trust, Bakers of Danbury’s stonemasons repointed the stone wall foundations with Lime Mortar and restored all visible stonework, using traditional methods which have been handed down generations of the 140-year-old company. Despite the starkness of the pointing against the older, dirtier masonry, Bakers' stonemasons matched the original core mortar as closely as possible.

The recent restoration works will protect the remains for many years to come, by preventing further erosion which can occur when the weather gets into the original core structure of the walls. All oak marker posts which mark the positions of the aisles and partition have been replaced with new.

Philip Wise, Colchester & Ipswich Museums said;

“These works will help to safeguard the future of these important Roman remains for the people of Colchester.”

Although Colchester Archaeological Trust agree the ruins are a “probable Romano-British Church”, the building was associated with two cemeteries one pagan and one Christian, which help support alternative theories around the buildings original use - perhaps later being converted to a Romano-British Church. These theories suggest it may have been originally been a pagan temple, a Roman mithraeum (Roman temple) or a hall for funerary feasts predating AD.320. The remains were awarded Scheduled Monument status by Historic England on 07 October 2020, ref 1470104. For more information visit historicengland.co.uk

To keep up to date on similar conservation projects carried out by Bakers of Danbury visit our Latest News page or the Bakers of Danbury Facebook page.

Grade II Listed Barn Conversion

Summary = A Grade II Listed barn conversion to provide entertainment suite, garages, kitchen/ bar area and gymnasium.

Challenge = The original Grade II Listed barn was in need of structural under pinning, together with timber frame and roof repairs.

Solution = Bakers recently carried out a conversion of a barn and stable block to provide an entertainment suite, garages, kitchen/ bar area and gymnasium which involved extensive timber frame and roof repairs, as well as structural underpinning.

All existing timber weather boarding was removed and repair work and straightening carried out to the existing timber frame. Repairs were made to the brick plinth and the roof completely stripped and restored with reclaimed peg tiles.

Bakers' joinery workshop hand crafted new doors, oak staircase and sepele sash casement windows to match the existing

To hear more about other projects similar to this Grade II Listed barn conversion visit our Latest News page or the Bakers of Danbury Facebook page.

Barn conversion

Summary = Barn conversion to provide a Grade II Listed luxury home.

Challenge = The original barn was in need of structural and roof repairs.

Solution = Bakers of Danbury carried out a conversion of a Grade II Listed barn to provide a luxury domestic dwelling. The original timber frame was repaired, carefully cleaned and retained.

The bedrooms were constructed on two mezzanine floors at each end of the barn, linked by a contemporary steel and glass walkway accessed by a steel, oak and glass staircase. The works included a hi-tech electronic lighting and sound system and underfloor heating.

To hear more about this and other projects visit our Latest News page or the Bakers of Danbury Facebook page.

Alteration and Restoration Works

Summary = Alteration and restoration works to a Grade II Listed home.

Challenge = Retaining existing structure whilst repairing decayed and damaged roof timbers.

Solution = Bakers recently built a hand-cut oak timber framed extension as well as carrying out other alterations and restoration works to the Grade II Listed Marygolds Barn in Essex. Believed to date back to the late 16th century, Little Loveney Hall lies within a well preserved medieval moat.

Bakers' team of carpenters, bricklayers, plasterers and groundworkers led by Matt Edwards and Terry Barber have carried out extensive internal restoration and alteration works which include new floors and finishes, plastering between the rafters using thermalime, re-pointing to the inglenook fireplace and repair and re-pointing to the central chimney stack, which has three diagonal shafts.

A new Oak timber framed extension was hand-cut, traditionally jointed and assembled on site. It provides a kitchen and dining room extension as well as a first floor bedroom with en-suite.

New heating, plumbing, electricity and lighting systems have been installed. Externally Bakers have carried out timber frame and timber roof repairs which include repairing the main rafter and truss and strengthenning and repair work to the primary beams. Repairs were carried out to the dormers and new sepele sash casement replacement windows were manufactured in Bakers of Danburys Joinery Workshop and installed on site to match the existing. A new render was applied with pargeted panels to match the existing.

To hear more about this and other projects visit our Latest News page or the Bakers of Danbury Facebook page.

Renovation and Internal Refurbishment

Summary = Renovation and internal refurbishment together with a new build pool house extension. To ensure the finished home was of the highest quality; the owners also stipulated bespoke high quality joinery and furniture to be installed throughout.

Challenge = This Grade ll Listed seven-bedroom house was in need of a substantial renovation and sympathetic internal refurbishment throughout; including heating and electrical installation, extensive external works and the demolition and rebuild of a new pool house.

Solution = The owners were aware of Bakers of Danbury's reputation for providing high quality craftsmanship and were pleased to find out, not only could Bakers of Danbury design the bespoke joinery and architectural timber work, but also can manufacture everything for the project by using their in-house joinery workshop

In total the team designed, manufactured and installed the following:

  • Internal bespoke fitted wardrobes
  • Internal doors, similar style to the original doors to comply with new fire regulations
  • Two new bespoke staircases with balustrades
  • Sash windows to match those existing and refurbishment of those windows that could be restored
  • Wall panelling to match the existing in the playroom and lounge area
  • Ornate radiator covers
  • In addition to the extensive joinery work, Bakers of Danbury also demolished and re-built the pool house. With new underground drainage, the new pool house now boasts tiled changing rooms throughout, themed lighting and handmade double glazed windows and French doors with fanlights to match the rest of the property.

    Inside the house a beautiful oak floor was salvaged from other rooms within the farm house and re-laid to make an impressive entrance lobby. Elsewhere, the original oak and parquet flooring was brought back to life after being taken up, re-laid, then expertly sanded and finished.

    As a result of the project, the home has truly been brought back to its former glory, with the attention to detail and high quality workmanship shining through. The owners described Bakers of Danbury as being “very professional, skilled and polite”.

    The owners were so impressed with the work carried out, that they asked Bakers of Danbury to return and restore their stable block.

    Westminster Deanery

    Summary = A refurbishment and roofing project at Westminster Deanery, which sits within the grounds of Westminster Abbey.

    Location = Westminster, London

    Challenge = Nationwide Lock down due to the Covid-19 pandemic

    Solution = Works continued safely on site during the Covid-19 lockdown, due to sensible planning and safe working procedures put in place on site. Bakers are currently midway through the £1.8 million refurbishment and roofing project at Westminster Deanery, which sits within the grounds of Westminster Abbey.

  • Westminster Deanery roof works
  • Roof works carried out by Bakers involved stripping the existing roof, recasting original lead and re-leading the roof adjacent to the West Towers of the abbey. The pitched tiled roof area was also stripped, with structural repairs undertaken and then retiled with a mix of reclaimed peg tiles and new handmade tiles . A full overhaul of the rainwater goods is also being undertaken, with refurbished cast iron and lead downpipes, hoppers and chutes. Bakers increased the gradient of the roof (compliant with lead sheet association guidelines).

  • Westminster Deanery refurbishment works
  • The entire deanery including a grand function room are being renovated which includes five bedrooms, a kitchen, utility, dining area and the Dean's study and offices, along with two bathrooms and the addition of one new bathroom. Upgraded electrical and mechanical installations are being completed, along with improvements to insulation wherever possible. Full decoration is also being undertaken externally, including the 15th Century elevation being stripped of many layers of paint to reveal the original brickwork façade underneath.

    A new hardwood doorway and canopy will lead to the refurbished garden, which will be landscaped and have new drainage installed before the Deanery is handed back at the end of this year.

    To hear more about this and other projects visit our Latest News page or the Bakers of Danbury Facebook page.