Tag Archives: London

Westminster Deanery

Summary = A refurbishment and roofing project at Westminster Deanery, which sits within the grounds of Westminster Abbey.

Location = Westminster, London

Challenge = Nationwide Lock down due to the Covid-19 pandemic

Solution = Works continued safely on site during the Covid-19 lockdown, due to sensible planning and safe working procedures put in place on site. Bakers are currently midway through the £1.8 million refurbishment and roofing project at Westminster Deanery, which sits within the grounds of Westminster Abbey.

  • Westminster Deanery roof works
  • Roof works carried out by Bakers involved stripping the existing roof, recasting original lead and re-leading the roof adjacent to the West Towers of the abbey. The pitched tiled roof area was also stripped, with structural repairs undertaken and then retiled with a mix of reclaimed peg tiles and new handmade tiles . A full overhaul of the rainwater goods is also being undertaken, with refurbished cast iron and lead downpipes, hoppers and chutes. Bakers increased the gradient of the roof (compliant with lead sheet association guidelines).

  • Westminster Deanery refurbishment works
  • The entire deanery including a grand function room are being renovated which includes five bedrooms, a kitchen, utility, dining area and the Dean's study and offices, along with two bathrooms and the addition of one new bathroom. Upgraded electrical and mechanical installations are being completed, along with improvements to insulation wherever possible. Full decoration is also being undertaken externally, including the 15th Century elevation being stripped of many layers of paint to reveal the original brickwork façade underneath.

    A new hardwood doorway and canopy will lead to the refurbished garden, which will be landscaped and have new drainage installed before the Deanery is handed back at the end of this year.

    To hear more about this and other projects visit our Latest News page or the Bakers of Danbury Facebook page.

    Westminster School

    Summary =Bakers of Danbury recently built an extension to the Grade I Listed Westminster School. The extension included two entrance lobbies, a new block of visitor w/c, a presentation/ reception room as well as four new offices and meeting rooms for school staff. Bakers also carried out refurbishment and renovation works to six rooms around the perimeter of the new build extension, as well as the installation of a new stairwell and lift.

    Location = Westminster, London

    Challenge =Westminster School is the only ancient school in London which still occupies its original site. The site of the new extension is very closely surrounded by Grade I Listed buildings, some dating back to the 11th century. Access was restricted due to working on a live school.

    Solution = Phase one involved carefully dismantling the modern concrete music center to protect the archaeology below ground and the listed buildings surrounding the site.

    During phase two, Bakers oversaw archaeological excavations,which were carried out in conjunction with Pre-Construct Archaeology. The archaeological excavations uncovered part of the original kitchen to the Monks Abbey dating back to the 11th century.

    A section of the new build floor (within the presentation/ reception room) was later covered with cantilevered glass to create a platform from which to view the archaeology below ground level. Close co-ordination between Bakers, the structural steelwork fabricator and the glass floor manufacturer was required because in some parts the glass floor were only 10mm away from the archaeology. Underfloor lighting and temperature control were installed to help preserve the archaeology.

    During phase three of the project, Bakers used traditional building techniques and materials to create the new build extension. The extension was constructed with handmade bricks, reclaimed tiles and handmade timber and lead light windows, and it's new lead roof which features an oak oval lantern, with complex lead soffit detail was installed.

    External restoration works were carried out to a number of surrounding school buildings together with an internal renovation to six rooms, plant-room and the installation of a new stairwell (with decorative balustrades) and lift. Bakers carried out extensive repointing and cleaning, as well as stone (Burford stone) and brick repair and replacement to the neighbouring Grade I Listed Ashburnham house.

    A full M&E package which covered both the new build extension and existing school buildings included a contractor led design disabled platform lift and a Daliv Control Lighting System which enables separate light settings for different parts of one room. The expansion of the plant-room provided a new heating system to the new extension together with an adaption to the existing school heating system. Landscaping was carried out to Little Deans Yard, which lays the front of Westminster School.

    The project was overseen by Bakers' Contract Manager Chris Norman. Throughout the project, monthly progress meetings took place with the Client, Ptolemy Dean Architects, Structural Engineers, M&E Consultant, Quantity Surveyor, Chris Norman and other representatives from Bakers of Danbury. The Contract Manager, Chris worked in close collaboration with the Project Quantity Surveyor to monitor the overall contract values, variation costs and the final contract sum.

    Less formal weekly meetings with the School Bursar took place with Chris Norman and the Site Manager to maintain communication between the Principal Contractor and Client, also enabling Bakers to organise works around any forthcoming School activities and restrictions. In addition to the Site Manager’s daily inspection of works, Chris Norman held a weekly site meeting with the Site Manager to inspect works, checking quality, health and safety and progress against the project programme.

    Sawston Village College

    Summary = Roof works and internal decoration to two college buildings

    Location = Cambridgeshire

    Challenge = The Grade II Listed buildings had to be protected from the weather whilst the roofs were stripped and replaced

    Solution = The project was divided into two phases and temporary roofs protected the Grade II Listed Henry Morris building during Phase one and the North Wing during Phase two of works.

    Phase one of works to Sawston Village College, an academy school founded in 1930, began April 2019. Works involved the installation of the temporary roof whilst the stripping and re-roofing of the Grade II Listed Henry Morris building took place. The existing pantiles were re-laid to the front elevation of the building and new handmade pantiles were installed to the back.

    Below the roof, the deteriorating lath and plaster ceiling to the main hall was replaced with new, which included the installation of new laths, scratch coat and a finish of thermalime plaster previously approved by the Conservation Officer. Existing facia boards were replaced and the cast iron gutters and downpipes were thoroughly sanded back to metal and painted. The bell tower underwent extensive repairs to the leaded lights, structural timber and boarding.

    The second phase of works included roof works to the North Wing of the College, similar to the roof works to the Henry Morris building. All roof works and internal decoration was completed in time to hand back to the College for the new Academic New Year.

    American Oak Panelling

    Summary: American Oak panelling measuring 220 m2 for a School of Science on Euston Road, London

    Location: Grafton House, Euston Road, London

    Client: Forrest Gate Construction

    Challenge: The oak panelling was across four floors. Each with a different layout

    Solution: Bakers of Danbury’s Specialist Joinery Department were asked to supply 220m2 of American White Oak for a refurbishment to Grafton House in London.

    The project was a conversion of an existing building to a modern science school.

    All of the panels and oak had to be class 0 fire rated. Baker’s Joiners painted and installed over 2000 meters of oak strips which were fixed to painted black 12mm MDF with spacing’s of 20mm to give a shadow gap appearance.

    The project was split across four floors and each floor had a different layout, so a full site survey was necessary to ensure each floor was measured correctly.

    National Trust, Rainham Hall

    Summary: Conservation and restoration of National Trust Rainham Hall. Conservation and restoration works were carried out to three floors of Rainham Hall and its Coach House. Works included the redevelopment of the Coach House into a tea room.

    Value: Approximately £1,500,000

    Location: London Borough of Havering

    Challenge: Provide wheelchair access to first floor of Coach House whilst retaining the aesthetic look of the building.

    Solution: Prior to the conservation and restoration project, the building had been in disrepair and on the Historic England at Risk Register. It had been completely inaccessible to the public.

    Constructed in the early eighteenth century, the Stable Block at Rainham Hall included a stable with a hayloft above with a brew house adjacent. When work started, it became clear that the roof had undergone various repairs and rebuilds in its history; leaving it with a poor structural integrity. Bakers of Danbury carried out structural roof repairs and re-tiling.

    During the conservation and restoration of National Trust Rainham Hall a temporary staircase gave visitors the chance to see the works up close during a number of 'Hard Hat' tours.

    Bakers of Danbury’s inhouse Specialist Joinery Shop built and installed a timber-clad vertical lift shaft with a spiral cantilevered staircase. The design of the new lift core, located in the within the Grade II Listed Brew House, echoes the large copper vats used in the 18th century brewing process.

    To the Main Hall, Bakers of Danbury undertook a large renovation project including a full M&E overhaul. Bakers of Danbury also installed new w/c and carried out conservator decorating.

    Externally Bakers of Danbury carried out re-pointing and brickwork repairs to all elevations.

    In October 2015, the Stable Block at Rainham Hall opened to the public as a café and community space.

    The conservation and restoration of National Trust Rainham Hall was shortlisted for the RICS Building Conservation Awards 2018.

    Extension to Grade II Listed Property

    Summary = A new build double storey extension which consisted of a garden room, dining room and first floor bedroom with en-suite.

    Value = £150,000

    Challenge = The extension had to constructed sensitively, to ensure its in keeping with the existing grade II Listed property.

    Solution = Bakers worked closely with the property owner throughout the build, to ensure they take part in all decision making. The extension was constructed to a high specification, with cornice designed to match the existing and new box frame sashes and french doors handmade in house by the Bakers’ Joinery workshop. Ashlar lines were applied to the exterior render to match the exterior of the existing property.

    The property was occupied whilst all works were carried out. To minimise disruption to the household; the extension was constructed, with the breakthrough to the existing house being carried out towards the end of the project.

    The owners were so impressed with the work carried out, they asked Bakers to return to repair their storm damaged barn. Works to the barn are due to complete later this year.

    Kitchen/ family room extension

    Value = £150,000

    Location = Woodford, London

    Summary = Single storey extension to a Victorian period property consisting of a large kitchen / family room, utility room, downstairs shower and w/c.

    Challenge = The property remained occupied whilst all works were carried out.

    Solution = As the extension was for a new kitchen / family room; bakers provided the client with a temporary kitchen to use during works, until the new kitchen was installed and final breakthrough into the house completed.

    Trusses were supported on steel flitch plates to create a large open plan kitchen and family living area, with vaulted ceilings, exposed truss tie beams and floor to ceiling length windows to the rear, to enjoy views of the large garden. The shower room was tiled with traditional Victorian tiles to the floor and walls. The rest of the kitchen family room extension is tiled with natural stone floor tiles. The terrace is paved, with vertical sleepers to retain ground levels.

    St Paul’s Cathedral, London

    Value = £750,000

    Location = London EC4

    Summary = Refurbishment to part of the Crypt

    Challenge = Works took place whilst the Cathedral remained open to the general public.

    Solution = In 2016 Bakers of Danbury returned to St Paul’s Cathedral, London - this time to refurbish part of the Crypt. Throughout the works, Bakers worked closely with the Cathedral works team to ensure works took place whilst the Cathedral remained open to the general public.

    This interesting project involved very careful excavation of the Crypt floor and close working with the Cathedral Archaeologist, to ensure that any remains found were reburied.

    The extensive refurbishment works included a new layout and refurbishment to the public washrooms, a total refurbishment of the Mezzanine floor, old clay pamment tiles laid from the Crypt to the public washrooms and comprehensive modern LED lighting installed to the Crypt and Mezzanine floor.

    St Brides, London

    Value = £614,000

    Location = Fleet Street London EC4

    Summary = Tower/spire cleaning and restoration of stonework.

    Challenge = Restricted access in the busy City of London.

    Solution = The iconic Grade 1 Listed church is the tallest of Sir Christopher Wren’s churches at 67m high with its distinctive and famous tiered spire being the inspiration of the wedding cake. Standing for over 300 years the church has survived world wars, years of air pollution and erosion from detrimental weather, so it is no surprise that after years of numerous sections of masonry falling from the structure to the ground, that substantial restoration work was urgently required.

    The initial phase of essential repairs to the Portland Stone tower & spire involved carefully cleaning the heavy carbon soiling, more than an inch thick in places, removal of all hard cement pointing and mortar repairs carried out in the 1950’s and repointing with lime mortar with around 350 new stone indents to the ashlar and moulded details.

    Many of Wren’s original carved stones including the Corinthian style column capitals were replicated and fully replaced and many carved sections delicately repaired.

    The unstable tower parapet & the eight 2m high ornate sculptured urns were reconstructed to remove Wren’s original rusting iron cram and replace them with stainless steel fixings. The tower & spire also benefited from new lead work to the tiered cornices of the spire to protect the masonry and improve weathering, a new lightning protection system and regilded weather vane.

    Chapter House, St Paul’s Cathedral

    Summary = Construction of a new third floor, internal alterations, new lift and two new staircases, internal and external refurbishment to the Chapter House at St Paul's Cathedral.

    Value = £2,200,000

    Location = St Paul's Cathedral, London

    Challenge = Working on a Grade II listed building within the city of London provided its own distinct set of challenges. The location of the works carried out were adjacent to the very busy Paternoster Square and St Pauls' Cathedral, therefore Bakers had to minimise the disruption to tourists, businesses and visitors. The client and architect were looking to provide a 21st century office and meeting space, while at the same time preserving the layout and traditional finishes seen in many parts of the building.

    Solution = Located immediately next to St Paul's Cathedral, the Chapter House, designed and built by Sir Christopher Wren and his son in 1715 is an elegant red brick building which provides offices for St Paul's Cathedral and also houses two intimate rooms available for private hire.

    St Paul's Cathedral, the Chapter House - New mansard roof

    Works involved the installation of a temporary roof whilst the existing roof was dismantled. A new lead mansard roof with windows was installed to create an additional floor of office space. The upper slope of the roof is not visible from street level when viewed from close proximity to the building. Within the new floor glass partitions divided the office space, and built in storage cupboards were manufactured and installed by Bakers joinery workshop.

    St Paul's Cathedral, the Chapter House - Alterations

    To the basement level, tanking and alterations were carried out to provide new office space and basement level w/c. Alteration works to the existing first and second floors included the installation of a new kitchen area. Glass partition walls were installed to the second floor to divide it into office space, whilst maintaining the original layout. A new oak reception desk was hand crafted and installed by Bakers' in-house joinery workshop. A new passenger lift was installed and two new oak staircases which were manufactured by Bakers' joinery workshop were designed and built around the new lift shaft.

    Internal redecoration to the first and second floors included the refurbishment of the oak wall panels to both function rooms. The parquet floor was refurbished within one function room, and a new stained oak floor was installed in the second function room. The oak wall panels to the offices on the first and second floors were also refurbished, and a complete redecoration was carried out.

    The full M & E package installed included air conditioning, ventilation and w/c for office staff. A data package was also installed for the existing and new offices and function rooms.

    St Paul's Cathedral, the Chapter House - External Conservation

    New York stone steps and coping stones were supplied by Bakers' sister company Collins and Curtis Masonry. The red brick exterior was cleaned and re-pointed, and the stone cut mouldings, pedimented doorways, cornice and paneled parapet were all repaired and cleaned. A new external platform lift clad with Portland stone was installed to provide access to the entrance for disabled visitors and staff.