Tag Archives: replacement stone

Bakers Featured in Listed Heritage Mag

Listed Heritage, the membership journal of the Listed Property Owners’ Club has featured one of Bakers of Danbury’s latest projects in its latest magazine.

The November/ December 2021 issue of the Listed Heritage looks at the interesting conservation project recently carried out by Bakers of Danbury Ltd, which involved stone conservation on a private property in Royston. Works included replacement stone quoins, window jambs, surrounds, lintels and window sills where the existing stone had deteriorated beyond repair.

To ensure the new replacement stone matched the existing, Collins and Curtis Masonry Ltd carefully selected Tottenhoe Clunch directly from the quarry and Bakers’ craftsmen measured and made templates of the individual stones which needed to be replaced.

You can find on page 98 by clicking here.

Highly Commended: The King of Prussia Award 2021

We are delighted to announce that our recent conservation and repair project on the west façade of St Leonard's Church in Shoreditch has received The King of Prussia, Highly Commended at the prestigious EASA & National Churches Trust UK Church Architecture Awards.

The award was presented by Nicholas Von Preussen, Prince Nicholas of Prussia. It was collected by Sarah Khan, Partner at Roger Mears Architects and Adrian Ward Contract Manager for Bakers of Danbury Limited.

To read about the conservation and repair works to St Leonard’s Church which included the repair and strengthening of the front portico click here.

Shortlisted: The King of Prussia Gold Medal

We are delighted to announce that our recent conservation and repair project on the west façade of St Leonard's Church in Shoreditch has been shortlisted for the prestigious EASA & National Churches Trust The King of Prussia Gold Medal. The project was recently Commended in the Heritage and Restoration Category of the Hackney Design Awards 2020.

The judges for Hackney Design Awards said;

“The careful and conservative repair to the west façade of this Grade I listed church is highly commended by the judge as a great example of the “touch lightly” approach to historic building conservation.”

It was reported that the judges were impressed by the amount of original material that the project team were able to retain by their painstaking process or investigation and design of repairs.

To read about the conservation and repair works to St Leonard’s Church which included the repair and strengthening of the front portico click here.

The EASA and National Churches Trust The King of Prussia Gold Medal is due to be announced at the beginning of November 2021

.

St Leonard’s Church, Shoreditch

Summary = Conservation and repair works to St Leonard’s Church, Shoreditch which included the repair and strengthening of the front portico, steeple and clocks.

Location = Shoreditch, London.

Challenge = Victorian alterations has compromised the church's structural integrity.

Solution = St Leonard's Church in Shoreditch is a Grade I listed church constructed in brick with a Portland stone façade and dressings, and slate roofs. Built in 1740, it is one of the oldest buildings in Shoreditch and is well known for its tall steeple.

Alterations made to the church by the Victorians left its structural integrity compromised. The church also suffered war damage and later was placed on the Historic England's Heritage at Risk Register. Since the 1990’s various works have been carried out to rebuild the church closer to its original form and rectify problems caused by Victorian alterations and war damage.

In 2016 Bakers installed a new slate roof to the north and south aisles and nave. Roof works included carpentry repairs, repairs and replacement of the cast iron rainwater goods, leadwork, masonry repairs and redecoration.

In 2019 Bakers carried out further conservation and repair works to St Leonard’s Church which included the repair and strengthening of the front portico, 192 ft steeple and clocks.

Restoration to the front portico which sits on the west façade was necessary due to water penetration caused by blocked roof outlets, which had led to the rusting of previous iron repairs, and in turn caused the portico stonework to spall and crack. A new Portico roof was installed with copings and new lead gutters and flashings. Other repairs carried out to the rest of the west façade included stone cleaning and repairs which were made to the clock level. Where stone indents were found to be beyond repair, Bakers’ sister company Collins and Curtis Masonry Ltd templated, cut and profiled replacement stone indents in Portland Stone to match the existing. The clocks were repaired and restored by specialists, back to their former glory.

In October 2019 a SPAB Repair of Old Buildings Course visited site at St Leonard's Church to view the restoration and repair works taking place and take part in a Q&A session with Roger Meers Architects, Bakers of Danbury’s skilled craftsmen, and Thwaits & Reed, the clockmakers who were refurbishing the clock at the time.

Works carried out over the years has helped preserve St Leonards Church for future generations and finally as a result of recent conservation works, St Leonard’s Church was recently removed from Historic England's Heritage at Risk register.

The conservation and repair project at St Leonard's Church has received King of Prussia, Highly Commended at the prestigious EASA & National Churches Trust UK Church Architecture Awards as well as Commended in the Heritage and Restoration Category of the Hackney Design Awards 2020. The judges at the Hackney Design Awards 2020 said;

“The careful and conservative repair to the west façade of this Grade I listed church is highly commended by the judge as a great example of the “touch lightly” approach to historic building conservation.”

It was reported that the judges were impressed by the amount of original material that the project team were able to retain by their painstaking process or investigation and design of repairs.

Stone Replacement & Conservation

Summary = stone replacement and conservation work to a residential property, which included stone quoins, stone window jambs, stone window surrounds, stone windowsills and stone lintels

Challenge = Exposure to the weather had deteriorated some of the stonework. New replacement stone had to be sourced and cut to size to match the original pieces.

Solution = Located on the edge of Royston Heath, which is famous for the former horse racecourse, within the ancient town of Royston in East Hertfordshire; this traditionally built property was originally three separate cottages. An earlier sympathetic conversion to all three cottages has provided one beautiful, spacious residential property, which features flint cobbled external walls and stone quoins. Exposure to the weather had sadly deteriorated some of the stonework.

As Bakers of Danbury Ltd were carrying out repair and conservation work to the local church, St John the Baptist which had been devastated by a fire back in 2018, the owners of this property asked Bakers to carry out stone replacement and conservation work to their property. Bakers’ craftsmen measured the individual stones they had identified as being beyond repair and made templates for replacement stones to match the original. Bakers of Danbury’s sister company Collins and Curtis Masonry Ltd carefully selected Tottenhoe Clunch directly from the quarry to match the existing Clunch stonework to this property.

All stone quoins to the main gable end were replaced, together with complete window jambs, surrounds and lintels, cut and profiled by stone masons to match the existing. Yorkstone from “Edgehill” quarry was used to replace the windowsills.

The existing flint cobbles were carefully reinstated, where they had been disturbed, and repointed with an NHL 3.5 lime mortar mix with selected graded aggregate sands and fine flint chippings incorporated to match the existing mortar.

To hear more about similar projects about stone replacement and conservation visit our Latest News page or the Bakers of Danbury Facebook page.

St Lawrence Jewry, London

Works are underway and scaffold wrap is going up around our restoration project at St Lawrence Jewry in London. To find out more about the project visit www.bakersofdanbury.co.uk

St Lawrence Jewry, London

Summary = Conservation and restoration works to St Lawrence Jewry, London, This project marks the largest phase of work to the building since the reconstruction by Cecil Brown in the 1950's.

Location = London

Challenge = The surviving Wren masonry suffers from heavy carbon staining and discoloration along with a pattern of defects

Solution = Under instruction from The City of London Corporation, Bakers recently started a large restoration project at St Lawrence Jewry, which stands in the yard of the Guildhall. The 18 month project is designed to return the Church to a sound state of repair and safeguard it for future generations.

St Lawrence Jewry, the official church of the Lord Mayor of the City of London, was first built in 1136 in the east end of London - the old Jewish quarter. It was rebuilt in 1677 by Christopher Wren after it was destroyed in the Great Fire of London, and reconstructed by Cecil Brown in 1957 after it was badly damaged in the Second World War.

Conservation and Restoration of St Lawrence Jewry, London

This project marks the largest phase of work to the building since the reconstruction by Cecil Brown in the 1950's. Many of the finishes to the roofs, gutters, cupola and spire date from then and are therefore towards the end of their service life, evidenced by the water ingress that has been an increasing problem in recent years. The surviving Wren masonry suffers from heavy carbon staining and discoloration along with a pattern of defects known as "corrosion jacking", caused by concealed iron cramps rusting, expanding and subsequently splitting and cracking the stonework.

Conservation and Restoration works

The Church will remain open during phase one of the project. Phase one works will involve the cleaning and repair of the masonry elevations, tower and carved stonework; structural work, re-roofing and thermal upgrading of the lead covered Nave; re-roofing of the Commonwealth Chapel, Vicarage apartment and to the south-west of the tower; repairs to the timber framed, lead-clad cupola and spire; replacement of lead gutters and downpipes; overhaul, cleaning and repair of all stained and plain glass windows; replacement of lightning protection; and the repair and structural strengthening of decorative fibrous plaster ceilings. Phase two which is due to start next year will involve all internal works.

Repairs to Medieval Wall

Summary = Repair to flint and stone masonry of a medieval wall at St John's Abbey Gate in Colchester

Value = Approximately £30,000

Location = Colchester, Essex

Challenge = Bakers was asked to repair a hole in the wall, but when Bakers started to remove loose masonry it became apparent that further repair work was necessary to stabilise the wall.

Solution = Investigations were carried out into the foundations, and it was found that they were suitable, so Bakers could continue with the conservation and repair works. Colchester Archaeological Trust were involved in the investigations.

Bakers carried out repairs to the collapsed section of the medieval masonry wall which formed part of the boundary to St John’s Abbey Gate in Colchester. The medieval masonry wall consists of various kent rag stone, flint, clunch and re-used masonry from the abbey with lime mortar.

All stone was salvaged, but where necessary Bakers had to source reclaimed stone to match the existing. Loose mortar was raked out, before being pointed with the new lime mortar which matched the existing. The new mortar used had been matched closely with the original mortar colour and was approved by the client.

Church Masonry Repairs

Summary = Emergency masonry repairs to church bell tower ruins

Value = Approximately £30,000

Location = East Bergholt, Suffolk

Challenge = The construction of the bell tower began in 1525, but the construction stopped in 1530, due to Cardinal Wolsey's fall from grace and the Reformation. Bakers carried out the necessary emergency repair works in 2017 as the bell tower masonry, which is exposed to the weather, had suffered damage.

Solution = Bakers carried out consolidation to the masonry walls which consist mainly of flint. Repairs were carried out to the cracks and sections of the mortar capping on top of the walls. Bakers surveyed the walls for loose stones, and re-bed any loose stones identified. Loose mortar was removed, and repointing was carried out to make the masonry walls safe and weatherproof.

Bakers also carried out brick repairs to the tower door and laid reclaimed pamnent tiles to the floor which leads to the exposed staircase within the tower walls.

Union Chapel, London

Summary = Conservation works to the east window of the Union Chapel in London.

Value = Approximately £40,000

Location = London

Challenge = Secondary glazing has caused damage to the stained glass window.

Solution = Bakers of Danbury Ltd recently carried out conservation works to the east window of the Union Chapel in London. The beautiful stained glass window had opaque secondary glazing on the outside of the window, which not only prevented the sun shining through the window to show its decorative image, but had also caused damage to the stained glass.

Bakers removed the secondary glazing together with the debris which had gathered at the base of the window. The glass was cleaned and damaged stone was replaced with new indented carved sections of bath stone to match the existing stone.

By removing the secondary glazing and cleaning the glass, the beautiful, bright window has once again become a focal point for the Chapel.

Watch the video at the top of this page to hear about conservation works carried out to the east window of the Union Chapel.

Union Chapel remains on the Historic England At Risk Register, so if you would like to make a donation visit www.unionchapel.org.uk